☆ Looking for a really good In Search of TimeE-Pub Author Dan Falk – grisedalelodge.co.uk

In Search of Time An enjoyable and compelling ride through one of life s most fascinating enigmas What, then, is time If no one ask of me, I know, St Augustine of Hippo lamented But if I wish to explain to him who asks, I know not Who wouldn t sympathize with Augustine s dilemma Time is at once intimately familiar and yet deeply mysterious It is thoroughly intangible We say it flows like a river yet when we try to examine that flow, the river seems reduced to a mirage No wonder philosophers, poets, and scientists have grappled with the idea of time for centuries.The enigma of time has also captivated science journalist Dan Falk, who sets off on an intellectual journey In Search of Time The quest takes him from the ancient observatories of stone age Ireland and England to the atomic clocks of the U.S Naval Observatory from the layers of geological deep time in an Arizona canyon to Albert Einstein s apartment in Switzerland Along the way he talks to scientists and scholars from California to New York, from Toronto to Oxford He speaks with anthropologists and historians about our deep desire to track time s cycles he talks to psychologists and neuroscientists about the mysteries of memory he quizzes astronomers about the beginning and end of time Not to mention our latest theories about time travel and the paradoxes it seems to entail We meet great minds from Aristotle to Kant, from Newton to Einstein and we hear from today s most profound thinkers Roger Penrose, Paul Davies, Julian Barbour, David Deutsch, Lee Smolin, and many .As usual, Dan Falk s style combines exhaustive research with a lively, accessible, and often humorous style, making In Search of Time a delightful tour through a most curious dimension From the Hardcover edition. Read In Search of Time author Dan Falk – grisedalelodge.co.uk

    15 thoughts on “☆ Looking for a really good In Search of TimeE-Pub Author Dan Falk – grisedalelodge.co.uk

  1. Falk is a science journalist The subtitle of In Search of Time is Journeys Along a Curious Dimension These two facts lead to an obvious conclusion This book is mostly about physics No surprises there However, the first few chapters a pretty light on science Falk talks about time from an anthropological and historical stand point He discusses how different societies in history interpreted time and how they measured it He talks about the first calendars and the first clocks This is all qu Falk is a science journalist The subtitle of In Search of Time is Journeys Along a Curious Dimension These two facts lead to an obvious conclusion This book is mostly about physics No surprises there However, the first few chapters a pretty light on science Falk talks about time from an anthropological and historical stand point He discusses how different societies in history interpreted time and how they measured it He talks about the first calendars and the first clocks This is all quite good fun as a physicist it can sometimes be hard for me to read popular physics because I m too close to the subject I have no such problems reading history.Soon enough, though, the hard science begins Falk takes a predictable route from Newton to Einstein and beyond to interesting yet untestable ideas like string theory He interviews lots of current physicists about their ideas about time and asks them what they think Einstei...

  2. I like the way this book talks about time in ancient civilizations

  3. He interviewd Barbour, Deutsch, and Penrose for this , but had no real idea what to ask them Also you can probably skip the first five chapters

  4. It s too bad that the author and I are so far as I know completely unrelated I m sure his research would make for fascinating conversation fodder at Thanksgivings In any case, and aside from a few redundant chapters at the end that retread material covered on the opening pages, Falk s book is an ideal bedtime companion that affords a fine evening read aloud In Search Of takes on diverse aspects of how we understand, perceive, observe, and describe time everything from the technologi It s too bad that the author and I are so far as I know completely unrelated I m sure his research would make for fascinating conversation fodder at Thanksgivings In any case, and aside from a few redundant chapters at the end that retread material covered on the opening pages, Falk s book is an ideal bedtime companion that affords a fine evening read aloud In Search Of takes on diverse aspects of how we understand, perceive, observe, and describe time everything from the technological and sociological history of calendars and clocks to the function of memory and sensory perception to relativity and new theoretical forays into quantum gravitation The author s witty, so much so that I often enjoyed reading the author s observations aloud C...

  5. Falk gets the pendulum swinging by taking his reader s back to prehistoric times, and his best guesses based upon anthropology and archaeology at how early humans gazed into the cosmos, noticed the circular patterns of stars, moon and the sun, and created a notion of time that was vaguely agreed upon with certain cultures throughout history providing an intriguing spin on the logical progression from then to now and onto later Despite the variety of interpretations, the general consensus is Falk gets the pendulum swinging by taking his reader s back to prehistoric times, and his best guesses based upon anthropology and archaeology at how early humans gazed into the cosmos, noticed the circular patterns of stars, moon and the sun, and created a notion of time that was vaguely agreed upon with certain cultures throughout history providing an intriguing spin on the logical progression from then to now and onto later Despite the variety of interpretations, the general consensus is that time can be measured and how machines, including pendulum based clocks, tell us everything we need ...

  6. An enjoyable and compelling ride through one of life s most fascinating enigmas What, then, is time If no one ask of me, I know, St Augustine of Hippo lamented But if I wish to explain to him who asks, I know not Who wouldn t sympathize with Augustine s dilemma Time is at once intimately familiar and yet deeply mysterious It is thoroughly intangible We say it flows like a river yet when we try to examine that flow, the river seems reduced to a mirage No wonder philosophers, poets, a An enjoyable and compelling ride through one of life s most fascinating enigmas What, then, is time If no one ask of me, I know, St Augustine of Hippo lamented But if I wish to explain to him who asks, I know not Who wouldn t sympathize with Augustine s dilemma Time is at once intimately familiar and yet deeply mysterious It is thoroughly intangible We say it flows like a river yet whe...

  7. A good, concise, very interesting overview ofor less current thought on the nature of time The book is a bit dated it came out in 2008, when the Large Hadron Collider had yet to be up and running and the Cramer reverse causality experiment hadn t yet occurred or HAD it Read the book Nevertheless, in 10 years I suppose not much can be added to what Einstein, Hawking, Penrose et al believed about time, and this volume goes over many opinions from many of those influential scientists A good, concise, very interesting overview ofor less current thought on the nature of time The book is a bit dated it came out in 2008, when the Large Hadron Collider had yet to be up and running and the Cramer reverse causality experiment hadn t yet occurred or HAD it Read the book Nevertheless, in 10 years I suppose not much can be added to wha...

  8. Excellent Didn t go as in depth as I would have wanted to go, but he provided plenty of sources for further reading.

  9. Very interesting The book brings the slippery business of time out for a brief look I found the discussions and examples interesting.

  10. After a tedious recap of time out of mind, this one gets interesting in the second half.

  11. Really interesting The last chapter was definitely my favorite.

  12. Dan Falk s In Search of Time is a thoroughly approachable and enjoyable review of what physicists and philosophers are able to tell us about the nature of time, an aspect of life that we take for granted as obvious and understooduntil you start to look at it closely Falk covers every aspect of time from ancient attempts to build astronomical clocks and the development of mechanical time keepers to Einstein s theories of relativity that shattered the illusion of any absolute standard for n Dan Falk s In Search of Time is a thoroughly approachable and enjoyable review of what physicists and philosophers are able to tell us about the nature of time, an aspect of life that we take for granted as obvious and understooduntil you start to look at it closely Falk covers every aspect of time from ancient attempts to build astronomical clocks and the development of mechanical time keepers to Einstein s theories of relativity that shattered the illusion of any absolute standard for now and the fallout it left philosophers to cope with The book s cover boldly declares Falk s book is what Hawking s Brief History of Time should have been No disrespect to Dr Hawking but I think this is probably a fitting pronouncement Discussions of time and what it is and how it seems to flow are reviewed through a brief walk through history, a few easy to understand physics lessons, ...

  13. Having just finished this book, I meant to take advantage of my Now to record my thoughts, before they are lost to the perhaps illusory past.Falk s treatment of time is roughly chronological, appropriate if somewhat alarming I spent a good deal of the book thinking I had mistook a bit of popular science for a treatment of the social and cultural perceptions of time through the ages Those, while interesting, were not my primary interest As with all history, however, Falk manages to spend Having just finished this book, I meant to take advantage of my Now to record my thoughts, before they are lost to the perhaps illusory past.Falk s treatment of time is roughly chronological, appropriate if somewhat alarming I spent a good deal of the book thinking I had mistook a bit of popular science for a treatment of the social and cultural perceptions of time through the ages Those, while interesting, were not my primary interest As with all history, however, Falk manages to spend as much time on the last hundred years as the ten thousand preceding them, which is appreciated.The brisk treatment of the science of time was complementary to my previous knowledge I was surprised to see David Deutsche appear as an important primary source, having read his Fabric of Reality a few years ago, but Falk does an admirable job...

  14. Whenever an author feels the need to insert himself into a nonfiction book, I can t help but cringe If you expurgated all the repetitions, rhetorical questions, and personal reflections, you might be left with 50 pages of solid information.Also I have no idea why the author felt the need to go for so many pages about some pet theory that animals have no capacity to imagine the past or future Not only does it seem absurd on the face of it, but rival theories weren t even voiced or examined It Whenever an author feels the need to insert himself into a nonfiction book, I can t help but cringe If you expurgated all the repetitions, rhetorical questions, and personal reflections, you might be left with 50 pages of solid information.Also I have no idea why the author felt the need to go for so many pages ab...

  15. This is a very good, recent book about just how little we really understand about the nature of time If you ve read a lot of books on the history of science, the first couple of chapters will seem a bit repetitive, as it covers ground that most books of that sort cover It explains how we ve improved our ability to measure time from the seasonal cycles and stone circles of the ancients to modern atomic clocks There s a good discussion of Newton s views on time as compared to Einstein s There This is a very good, recent book about just how little we really understand about the nature of time If you ve read a lot of books on the history of science, the first couple of chapters will seem a bit repetitive, as it covers ground that most books of that sort cover It explains how we ve improved our ability to measure time from the seasonal cycles and stone circles of the ancients to modern atomic clocks There s a good discussion of Newton s views on time as compared to Einstein s There are some chapters on how scientists think time and the universe began and another on how they re likely to end There is good coverage of the philosophers views on time The author notes that the biggest puzzle is the sense we have that time flows That typically means that it moves with respect to something else But what is that something else How do you mea...