☆ True Books Full Moon FeastEbook By Jessica Prentice – grisedalelodge.co.uk

Full Moon Feast Full Moon Feast invites us to a table brimming with locally grown foods, radical wisdom, and communal nourishment.In Full Moon Feast, accomplished chef and passionate food activist Jessica Prentice champions locally grown, humanely raised, nutrient rich foods and traditional cooking methods The book follows the thirteen lunar cycles of an agrarian year, from the midwinter Hunger Moon and the springtime sweetness of the Sap Moon to the bounty of the Moon When Salmon Return to Earth in autumn Each chapter includes recipes that display the richly satisfying flavors of foods tied to the ancient rhythm of the seasons.Prentice decries our modern food culture megafarms and factories, the chemically processed ghosts of real foods in our diets, and the suffering physical, emotional, cultural, communal, and spiritual born of a disconnect from our food sources She laments the system that is poisoning our bodies and our communities.But Full Moon Feast is a celebration, not a dirge Prentice has emerged from her own early struggles with food to offer health, nourishment, and fulfillment to her readers She recounts her relationships with local farmers alongside ancient harvest legends and methods of food preparation from indigenous cultures around the world.Combining the radical nutrition of Sally Fallon s Nourishing Traditions, keen agri political acumen, and a spiritual sensibility that draws from indigenous as well as Western traditions, Full Moon Feast is a call to reconnect to our food, our land, and each other. Best Read [ Full Moon Feast ] Author [ Jessica Prentice ] – grisedalelodge.co.uk

    10 thoughts on “☆ True Books Full Moon FeastEbook By Jessica Prentice – grisedalelodge.co.uk

  1. Beautiful exploration of our relationship to food through looking at different eating practices across cultures Reading this book really gave me a new perspective on a lot of food practices I take for granted, and has given me lots of ideas about what a healthy diet could look like.I felt that, at times, the author romanticized indigenous cultures and traditional ways of making food Although she gave a lot of specific examples of food practices from a wide variety of cultures, she also often Beautiful exploration of our relationship to food through looking at different eating practices across cultures Reading this book really gave me a new perspective on a lot of food practices I take for granted, and has given me lots of ideas about what a healthy diet could look like.I felt that, at times, the author romanticized indigenous cultures and traditional ways of making food Although she gave a lot of specific examples of food practices from a wide variety of cultures, she also often referred to traditional and indigenous cultures as if they are unitary groups with a single practice Also, as my partner remarked when I described the author s complaints about modern food preservation Spoken like someone from a culture where food borne pathogens are no longer widespread And it sure sounds mystical and magical to grind your own grain when you don t have to do it every day.I don t disagree with her point that we ve lost our connection to food and the earth thr...

  2. This is not a cookbook, and it is not a diet book If you are going in to it thinking it is either of these, you will be disappointed It does give some recipes at the end of each chapter, which all deal with a certain lunar period.The book isabout reconnecting with the natural cycles of nature, and instead of focusing on seasonal eating by Summer, Fall, Winter, Spring she uses lunar cycles This isn t New Age as I have seen some other comments suggesting She doesn t talk about ange This is not a cookbook, and it is not a diet book If you are going in to it thinking it is either of these, you will be disappointed It...

  3. If Anthony Bourdain, Joesph Campbell, and Michael Pollan had a love child, it would be Jessica Prentice I loved this book Loved I want to drive to Richmond and find Jessica and talk to her, see her grain mill, and watch her cook I know that sounds stalker Not the goal It s just that I read this book with so much nodding and yes This book is where I needed In Defense of Food to go Eating food is a good start, but filling our selves...

  4. I admire the ideal that Jessica Prentice is aiming for a world in which we are able to eat locally grown, humanely raised foods prepared via traditional methods In thirteen chapters, each dealing with a specific kind of food and named after a Native American or other traditional month, Prentice discusses each food, contrasting how it was historically raised and prepared with how we deal with it in our world of large scale agriculture and convenience foods She adds bits of her personal histo I admire the ideal that Jessica Prentice is aiming for a world in which we are able to eat locally grown, humanely raised foods prepared via traditional methods In thirteen chapters, each dealing with a specific kind of food and named after a Native American or other traditional month, Prentice discusses each food, contrasting how it was historically raised and prepared with how we deal with it in our world of large scale agriculture and convenience foods She adds bits of her personal history with food and health through the book a former vegetarian, she eventually began eating meat again, in great...

  5. Jessica Prentice is a chef and food activist in the San Francisco Bay area who is an avid proponent for locally grown foods In other words, she urges us toward tradition Full Moon Feast is a book about food andwith stories from Indigenous cultures of appreciation for what nourishes It also tells of challenges and ...

  6. With compelling articles and comprehensive sources, Prentice writes evocatively about our Western shift in diet and the backlash with our health This book does a good job of balancing the dietary warnings with celebrations of ancient food and the communal practice of collecting and cooking it She takes examples from all over the world, and clearly spent a long time researching methods and practices of worl...

  7. One of my top 10 favorite books of all times I have just reread this book although I read it originally back in 2005 or so For some reason, the second time around is evenpowerful Her words are like getting a full body massage deeply nourishing, connecting, and loving Her book draws on all of our ancestral cultures which followed the cycles of the moon Each chapter focuses on a particular moon harvest moon, sap...

  8. If this is someone s first book on traditional foods and the evils of modern foodstuffs, then this might be a 4 5 star book She is Christian, but I still don t appreciate her views on evolution, global warming, petroleum it s a myth that we are running out and sexuality If it weren t for those, I probably would have given it 4 stars Food topics are organized and discussed under t...

  9. So I m not 100% finished this book, but I do know that I quite like it so far It is not solely a cookbook, in fact, I d say that the bulk of the book is dedicated to explanation.There a lot of things I like about this book, such as NOT lumping Native cultures under Native Americans , but finding sources and the proper names of bands tribes, using their languages where she can.Also, there is really good commentary on veganism and Indigenous reality, which might upset some not so critically thin So I m not 100% finished this book, but I do know that I quite like it so far It is not solely a cookbook, in fact, I d say that the bulk of the book is dedicated to exp...

  10. This book was very interesting The author is some stripe of Christian but, obviously playing with lots of ideas, working to form a synergy of meaning from multiple cultures and traditions and stepping outside of the box I enjoyed her focus on community, and the social nature of food and eating I feel the same way and thought many of her philosophical ideas were charming There were lots of recipes I want to try at the ends of the chapters and I am looking forward to flipping through the seaso This book was very interesting The author is some stripe of Christian but, obviously playing with lots of ideas, working to form a synergy of meaning from multiple cultures and traditions and stepping outside of the box I enjoyed her focus on community, and the social nature of food and eating I feel the same way and th...